Monday, 8 October 2018


Fully brief your partner on a new car’s technology

I changed my car a few months ago. It’s spanking new and as with past updates to my preferred method of transport it left me shaking my head at the technology you now get as standard.
Automatic climate control (on my first car, a Mk 1 Ford Cortina, that meant opening and closing the windows); tyre pressure warning lights (Cortina warning if a tyre was low on pressure was being unable to steer in a straight line) and rear parking sensors (you knew you’d gone too far in the Cortina when you heard the thump of an immovable object).
It was that last technological improvement that almost proved embarrassing last month.
Unfortunate juxtaposition in a newsletter we received.
SWMBO and I were in Devon for a friend’s landmark birthday celebrations. We rented a small cottage for the weekend and the parking space outside was at a jaunty angle against a wall and just Focus-length.
SWMBO, who is a wonderful, careful, considerate and safe driver (she told me) was in the driver’s seat on the day after the party when we returned to said cottage from lunch.
As she drove, carefully, up the slight slope into the space, with yours truly acting as Parking Superintendent, she edged ever closer to the wall.
I ended up having to shout quite loudly as the car almost touched the wall and only a sharp bang on the passenger window brought the car to a halt.
“That was close” I muttered as SWMBO exited the car. “You very nearly hit the wall despite my Olympic-medal winning gesturing.”
“Oh,” my dearest replied, “I thought there were parking sensors on the front.”
And the lesson is – fully brief your partner on a new car’s technology before he/ she drives it for the first time.

Monday, 1 October 2018

Is it influence or just pure coincidence?

Well, well, well. My reader might not have answered on a postcard as I requested in my last blog about my banking app but the missive attracted a few comments.
First off the mark was RB of F: “I had the same with Lloyd’s and I couldn’t erase the new smartphone app- arghhhhhhh.”
This was swiftly followed by an email from TP of M: “Totally agree with you!”
And finally TC of E weighed in: “I totally agree – b******s.”
Thank you. For the comments but mainly for bothering to read IDGOM.
While on this subject, I do have a bit of an update.
The game of electronic ping-pong, you may remember, went on for a while until a new message appeared stating that my iPad operating system no longer supported the new app. So, I was expecting the worst.
But I am pleased to tell you that I appear to have some influence after all. The app did stop working on the pre-determined date as stated but then, rather miraculously, it started working again.
Maybe it wasn’t beyond the bank’s tech team’s abilities to ensure loyal customers who do not upgrade phones and tablets every time a new version is released could take advantage of mobile banking by issuing a cut down version of the app. Or maybe just coincidence?

Tuesday, 25 September 2018


I am really not very Appy with my bank

My bank has disappointed me. It has refused to buy me a new iPad (other tablets are available) but I felt my request for a replacement, paid for out of its enormous profits, was perfectly reasonable.
You see, I have an iPad2 which is fairly elderly but still in good nick and suited to my needs. I use it for many tasks, including online banking. In fact I downloaded my bank’s app as soon as it was released a few years back and have been happily transferring money between accounts, paying bills etc.
Then I get a message telling me I have to update the app. No problem to a man of my technical ability. Except every time I tried to update it diverted me to the download section of the Apple App store – and “told” me that I already had the app installed.
This game of electronic ping-pong went on for a while until a new message appeared – my iPad operating system no longer supported the new app.
My options were simple – buy a new iPad with a more recent operating system or stop using the app. But why should I be forced into shelling out for a piece of kit I don’t really want?
I spoke with my bank and it was confirmed that the app would not work on my tablet. And no, I was told, the bank could not buy me a newer model.
I understand the constant drive for upgrading apps and technology but would it have been beyond the bank’s tech team’s abilities to ensure loyal customers who do not upgrade phones and tablets every time a new version is released could take advantage of mobile banking by issuing a cut down version of the app?
Answers on a postcard, please.